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How To Determine When You’ll Pay More For A Mortgage

A recent article from the Globe and Mail gives some good detail on why a borrower may be offered a higher or lower interest rate on a mortgage. This happens for many reasons, as described in the attached article, however it’s happening even more now with all the government rule changes that have been imposed over the past few years.
 
A borrower needs to remember though that rate is just one part of overall total borrowing costs. There are a number of other things to look at; the biggest one being how are penalties calculated. Penalties are calculated differently and can result in thousands of dollars difference if and when ever faced with one. 
 
Take a read of the attached article from The Globe & Mail for all the details on what rate premium/discount you may receive depending on your borrowing needs:
 
 

How to determine when you’ll pay more for a mortgage

Nobody wants to pay more than necessary when getting a mortgage. But more than four out of five applicants have little chance at getting Canada’s true lowest rate.


Rock-bottom rates are reserved only for mortgages that present the least risk and cost for the lender. And relatively few mortgages fall into this bucket.


Mortgages have always been priced based on the risk you present to the lender. But after 10 years of government rule tightening, that’s true today more than ever.


At this very minute, the absolute lowest contractual mortgage rate in Canada is 2.4 per cent, as tracked by RateSpy.com. It’s a variable rate available solely to impeccable credit borrowers financing a primary-residence purchase and paying for default insurance. It’s got a bunch of other restrictions, too.


If you need more flexible financing, you’ve got to fork out more − no way around it.


How much more hangs on what kind of mortgage you need.


To help illustrate how your risk profile plays into the rate you can expect, I’ve put together the list you see below. It shows approximately how much extra you’ll pay for a given mortgage type, versus today’s lowest available mortgage rate of 2.4 per cent.


This rate premium in the right column is based on the cheapest mortgage available for the criteria in the left column, regardless of lender or term.


It shows you the very least you’d have to pay to get a given feature, as of this moment in time. For example, compared with Canada’s lowest rate (2.4 per cent), you’d have to pay almost 0.35 percentage points more (i.e., 2.75 per cent total) for the cheapest mortgage that allows a 30-year amortization.


If multiple criteria apply to you, you’ll often pay a combination of the below rate premiums.


In some cases, you’ll also pay more for:

  • A longer rate guarantee (e.g., 120 days instead of 30 or 60)
  • A smaller down payment (e.g., 20 per cent instead of 35 per cent)
  • A more favourable penalty policy (if you decide to break the mortgage early)
  • Semiannual compounding on variable rates (instead of more expensive monthly compounding)
  • A short remaining amortization (e.g., nine years)


The point of all this is to show how lenders think and price. They upcharge for almost anything that materially increases their costs and/or the risk that you won’t pay them back. While most things are negotiable in life, lenders generally don’t budge very much if your application presents a materially higher risk of default − that is, unless their starting rate is uncompetitive to begin with.


With competition and rule changes squeezing lenders’ profitability now more than ever, you really do get what you pay for in a mortgage.



Full Article >


Regards,


Tony Marchigiano  

Mortgage Broker
310-328 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, BC

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